Browse Exhibits (8 total)

A Woman of the Century by Birthplace

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This exhibition presents the women in A Woman of the Century by Birthplace.

For each state or country, individuals are listed alphabetically by birthplace.  Each woman's space includes her birthplace, her name as listed in A Woman of the Century, her occupation as listed in A Woman of the Century, her status for the project (Available, In progress, Needs additional research and synthesis, or Complete), and the page(s) of her profile in A Woman of the Century.  Please click on a woman's image to see her item record.

This is a working list and will be added to and updated regularly.

A Woman of the Century by Generation

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This exhibition presents the women in A Woman of the Century by generation.

Please click on a woman's image to see her item.

A Woman of the Century by Occupation

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This exhibition presents the women in A Woman of the Century by broad Occupational Categories.

Within this wonderful book, the original contributors listed a variety of occupations for the women.  In one biographical sketch, a woman may be listed as a physician. However, someone similar may be listed in her biographical sketch as a doctor of medicine.  To facilitate comparative analysis, the women are grouped in broad occupational categories.  Many of these women were active in different professions and activities during their lifetimes, so women may appear in more than one category.

In addition to the general Reform category, there are subcategories for Anti-Slavery, Temperance, and Women's Rights.

For each occupational category, individuals are listed alphabetically.  Each woman's space includes her name as listed in A Woman of the Century, her occupation as listed in A Woman of the Century,  her birthplace, her status for the project (Available, In progress, Needs additional research and synthesis, or Complete), and the page(s) of her profile in A Woman of the Century.  Please click on a woman's image to see her item record.

This is a working list and will be added to and updated regularly.

A Woman of the Century: Postcards from the Past

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In 19th century antebellum America, there was a growing demand for women’s travel books.  Women were finally going places and writing about their travels.  At least three of those books were written by American women who were later immortalized in A Woman of the Century, including prominent author Catharine Maria Sedgwick.

This exhibition explores the role of American writers in the development of a new genre of literature in the 1820s and 1830s--the women’s travel book of first-person narratives--before shipbuilding advances made transatlantic travel even easier in the 1840s and 1850s.  The exhibition then examines the role that Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s literary network might have played in encouraging publication of her 1841 travelogue Letters from Abroad to Kindred at Home.  

Finally, this exhibition shares Catharine’s impressions of 19th century Europe from her travel book along with illustrative images to bring the 21st-century reader the equivalent of a postcard from the past.  Although early 19th-century travel books were intended to educate readers about a variety of topics, they now give 21st-century readers a special snapshot of life before the invention and dissemination of the daguerreotype in 1839. 

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A Woman of the Century: Massachusetts Women in A Woman of the Century

A Woman of the Century includes one hundred sixty-four women who were born in Massachusetts.  Some spent their whole lives there, while others moved to other states and to Europe.

This exhibition analyzes the occupational choices of the women, presents some of the Massachusetts women in A Woman of the Century who were born during different eras, and highlights some of the authors from Massachusetts.

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A Woman of the Century: Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century Contributors Project

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A Woman of the Century:  

Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century Contributors Project

     Who contributed to the creation of A Woman of the Century?  What do contributors to A Woman of the Century: A Crowdsourcing Project of the Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century need to know about the book's creation and the process of creating an item record?  

     By the time they have completed the activities in A Woman of the Century: Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century Contributors Project, people interested in this project will be able to answer both of those questions and many more.  A Woman of the Century is a tome, and it would be impossible to create activities related to all aspects of it. However, by selecting representative topics and activities, this project will help students and other contributors engage in historical and critical thinking, and learn about Omeka, as they prepare to become members of the project's Twenty-First Century team.  

     This project includes eight activities, many of which include primary source resources, a list of women for study and item creation,  and examples of item records, for students who will be taking a Women in American History course.  The activities may also be of interest to other contributors and all people interested in learning about the book and this site, A Woman of the Century:  A Crowdsourcing Project of the Nineteenth and Twenty-First Centuries.

     In  Teaching History in the Digital Age,  Dr. Mills Kelly presents fifteen characteristics of historical thinking.  Using specific examples related to A Woman of the Century, the activities in this collection will provide students and contributors with opportunities for practicing several of the types of historical thinking that Dr. Kelly mentions, hopefully providing them with valuable tools for their intellectual toolboxes.

      "The History Curriculum in 2023," another of Dr. Kelly's pieces, discusses  Making, Mining, Marking, and Mashing, which are four ways that students can learn to engage in historical thinking during this digital age. The activities in this collection will require the students and contributors to participate in all four components.  The students and contributors are "making" by interpreting the material and presenting their ideas on blogs and on an Omeka exhibit. This "mining" piece of the project will teach the students about historical databases, about searching with them, about the subjectivity of resources, how to deal with conflicting data, about synthesizing information, about working with Omeka fields, and about creating online bibliographies to assist other researchers.  Another part of the project relates to "marking," as it attempts to demystify the need for including detailed metadata in Item Records. In this exercise, students and others will utilize metadata to discover trends about these women. Finally, they will be "mashing" by working with digital maps on their Item Records.

     The project culminates with students utilizing the knowledge and material that they have acquired to create a basic Item Record.  

     At the end of the semester, the Women in American History students will create exhibitions related to the women they are studying.  All Twenty-First Century contributors are most welcome to create exhibitions on topics that they find fascinating and important!

Honoring the Suffragists from A Woman of the Century

August 2020 marks the Suffrage Centennial.  This exhibition highlights some of the women in A Woman of the Century who worked so hard to help women gain the vote.

Women of the Week

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Which women had birthdays this week?   

What contributions did they make?